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Tag Archives: d300

Building projects of all sizes are exciting.  I love how the many small details fit into fewer larger ideas to come together in creating a solution, whether it’s a dwelling, a road, a bridge, or even a whole city.  Al Hamra, both as a project and a building, is in a class of its own.  Even if one is not interested in architecture or skyscrapers, this building is different.  It will (already has) change the skyline Kuwait City for ever. The design is simple, beautiful and unique; and it brings a new level of creativity and sophistication to our city.  If that’s not enough, it also happens to be the tallest carved building, and one of tallest skyscrapers in the world.

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It’s that time of year when we take back our garden and own the outside space of our home.   We maintain our small garden to give us pleasure all year from the window looking out, but during autumn and spring it offers us a more tangeable pay-back.

This post is a collection of images taken in the past few days.  It’s a small space with many users.

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Over the course of ten days, these green-haired gremlins managed what many of my friends would dream of achieving in ten years.  I’m not one to talk myself; heading as I am to Baldsville, at bullet-speed, on the main road in.  My wife bought these for the children to enjoy and they sat in the dining room where I captured the progress every other morning.  The first photo, below, was taken on October 1st; and the last one on October 11th.

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The world is a funny place.  When I took these photos, I didn’t imagine that tomatoes would be the hot news topic in Kuwait!  During our stay in London, my wife’s best friend visited us and gave us a cherry-tomato plant.  My daughter, Noor, loves cherry tomatoes… Always has done.  We placed it in a shielded bright spot and tied the long branches to secure them.

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عيدكم مبارك و تقبل الله طاعتكم

I wish you and your loved ones a Happy Eid.  May Allah’s blessings follow you always.

Smiles start with the young and extend to all generations in this city.  It’s when I witness moments like these that I wish my children join me on business trips.  They would have loved it.  Hundreds of kids playing in water puddles.  It looked liked so much fun and the weather was so sticky, I wanted to join in myself.

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Some of my readers were expecting photos of the Lake District (Cumbria) by now, but my holiday was deferred a week and I ended up in London instead.  The reason was an unplanned business trip for an urgent negotiation in Seoul.  Work-wise the trip didn’t go as well as we had hoped; but I was glad to use the opportunity to see the place. I only spent two days there, and they were enough to leave with a very positive impression of Seoul.

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One of the best ways to see a large city is on a bicycle.  For someone with my level of fitness, this means taking a bike onto a train then spending the day exploring, remembering of course to take regular breaks.  It was the last day before Ramadan so I had to take my chance despite the forecasted wet weather.

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Zorro is a silver java finch who was born in Kuwait January this year.  You may remember my post about the zebra finches. Well, this little boy also comes from my brother-in-law.  He kindly looked after him in the critical first couple of weeks – after the egg hatched; something only an experienced breeder should attempt.  I picked him up one evening in February, and he’s been at our house ever since.  When we first got him he was one colour.  I explained to the kids that he would soon develop his permenant colour, which would include a ‘mask’ near his eyes.  We were thinking of names at this point, and my wife came up with Zorro… The perfect name!  No-one argued.

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This has been sitting in my notebook for almost a year.  Soon after my short experiment with lightwriting,  I watched an episode of Scott Wittenburg’s photography podcast and the subject was ‘physiograms’.  It was the first time I ever heard the term, and as soon as I looked it up on flickr, I was captivated.

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I took this photo last year when we spent the day at an animal park just outside London.  I posted this, and a few other images, on the National Geographic website soon after.  Earlier this week, I received an email from them asking me to add it to their stock website.  It’s a great feeling to get recognition from an organisation that I respect and admire – even if it’s only for one image.  It’s like a pat-on-the-back from a close relative.

I like National Geographic.  I don’t tend to watch much of their channel, but I love their magazine.  I even managed to subscribe electronically earlier this year – which has been fantastic. Recently I saw their advert for their back-issues from 1888 to 2008.  When I mentioned it to my dear father, he kindly offered it to me as a gift. We’ll be ordering it soon.

Yousef was at a football-themed birthday party today.  His school’s last-day-party also has a football theme.  Football fever is everywhere I look.  Tonight is England’s first game.  I’ve supported England for as long as I remember and, in true fatherly fashion, I’m imposing this onto my children.

This is a great timetable which I came across on SomeContrast – please note the time difference means you add an hour to get Kuwait time.  Whoever you’re supporting, enjoy the World Cup!

This is my first attempt in a local photography competition.  I’ve tried a couple of times online (National Geographic and British Airways’ HighLife magazine) but this time I had to provide prints, which somehow made it feel more real.  I read about the competition on Mathai’s blog some time ago.  The deadline is tomorrow, so if you’re interested you will need to hurry up. Link.

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During a short trip to Cairo, I did two long drives for meetings in Suez and Alexandria.  We returned the same day on both occasions.  Last time, I managed to drive around Alexandria – to at least see it having done the drive.  This time, I had a chance to see the Suez Canal, for about ten minutes,  after our meeting.  Ships are kept at either end and released in groups.  We were lucky to arrive at a time when ships were sailing past.

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